Boeing (BA) Offering Possible 43.88% Return Over the Next 29 Calendar Days

Boeing's most recent trend suggests a bullish bias. One trading opportunity on Boeing is a Bull Put Spread using a strike $355.00 short put and a strike $345.00 long put offers a potential 43.88% return on risk over the next 29 calendar days. Maximum profit would be generated if the Bull Put Spread were to expire worthless, which would occur if the stock were above $355.00 by expiration. The full premium credit of $3.05 would be kept by the premium seller. The risk of $6.95 would be incurred if the stock dropped below the $345.00 long put strike price.

The 5-day moving average is moving up which suggests that the short-term momentum for Boeing is bullish and the probability of a rise in share price is higher if the stock starts trending.

The 20-day moving average is moving up which suggests that the medium-term momentum for Boeing is bullish.

The RSI indicator is at 43.88 level which suggests that the stock is neither overbought nor oversold at this time.

To learn how to execute such a strategy while accounting for risk and reward in the context of smart portfolio management, and see how to trade live with a successful professional trader, view more here


LATEST NEWS for Boeing

How Much Boeing Stock Is Worth If the 737 MAX Never Flies Again
Wed, 17 Jul 2019 09:00:00 +0000
It’s now likely Boeing’s troubled 737 MAX jets won’t return to service until 2020. But the stock’s reaction has been muted. Should investors be thinking about a life for Boeing without the MAX?

Deutsche Bank Is Cutting Tech Spending as Digital Revolution Rages
Wed, 17 Jul 2019 04:00:00 +0000
(Bloomberg) — Want the lowdown on European markets? In your inbox before the open, every day. Sign up here.At the heart of Chief Executive Officer Christian Sewing’s turnaround plan for Deutsche Bank AG is a contrarian bet: that he can cut spending on technology while gaining ground on the competition.Even with the digital revolution in finance accelerating, Deutsche Bank expects to trim its annual outlays on tech to 2.9 billion euros ($3.3 billion) in 2022 from a peak of 4.2 billion euros this year.“Deutsche Bank would probably love to be spending more on technology, but they need money for other parts of their restructuring,” said Pierre Drach, managing director of Independent Research in Frankfurt. “It’s pretty much impossible for European banks to catch up with the Americans at this stage.”Sewing’s team says it’s made progress in fixing information networks that his predecessor called “antiquated and inadequate.” Years of expansion left it with systems that couldn’t communicate with each other and didn’t adequately track its business. The bank, which has spent almost $18.5 billion on legal settlements and fines since 2008, has also suggested that the past breakdown in controls stemmed in part from weak systems.The 4.2 billion euros Deutsche Bank has budgeted this year to maintain and modernize its systems represents a fraction of the $11.5 billion JPMorgan Chase & Co. shells out. "You have to spend to win" with new technologies, Jamie Dimon, the bank’s CEO, said Tuesday.The gap is set to widen as the German chief executive wants to cut technology costs by almost a quarter. European banks, meanwhile, are forecast to increase tech spending at a 4.8% annual rate through 2022, according to the consulting firm Celent.“We continue to invest in IT to serve clients better, become safer, more efficient and better controlled,” Senthuran Shanmugasivam, a Deutsche Bank spokesman, said in response to questions from Bloomberg. “Despite our smaller footprint, our investment plans in 2019 are broadly unchanged as we reallocate resources to our core businesses.”It’s all part of a retrenchment Sewing announced last week to exit equities sales and trading and eliminate 18,000 jobs. Deutsche Bank aims to cut adjusted costs to 17 billion euros in 2022 from 22.8 billion euros last year; the share of technology expenses would remain stable over that time period.The company can modernize systems while spending less, for example by moving most of its applications to the cloud, according to Frank Kuhnke, who oversees its technology. He said Deutsche Bank has already cut the cost of crunching data by more than 30% since 2016 even as it increased computing capacity by about 12% a year to meet regulatory demands.Still, Deutsche Bank needs “to make a further step change in embracing technology,” Sewing told analysts last week.New HiresThe CEO has brought in new talent to do that. Bernd Leukert, who left the management board of software company SAP SE earlier this year, will start in September. Neal Pawar will join as chief information officer from AQR Capital Management the same month.Hiring outsiders hasn’t been a panacea in the past. Kim Hammonds, a former Boeing Co. executive, spent about four and a half years rebuilding the bank’s systems only to be ousted in 2018 after reportedly calling the bank “the most dysfunctional company” she’d ever worked for.Deutsche Bank expects its retrenchment from businesses to allow it to focus on its core operations. It will also save about 300 million euros by 2022 by shedding almost 5,000 external IT contractors and replacing them with internal staff at a lower cost. The integration of consumer lender Postbank will avoid duplication of expenses.The digital revolution is upending all aspects of finance — from taking deposits to bond trading, a traditional Deutsche Bank strength. Citigroup Inc. has created a fintech division to invest in debt-market technologies while Spain’s Banco Bilbao Vizcaya Argentaria SA has created a unit to automate trade processes and generate intelligence from data. Dutch bank ING Groep NV has used artificial intelligence to win 20% more bond trades and cut costs.Cutting tech costs is also notoriously difficult.A three-year initiative announced in 2012 failed to stop technology spending from ballooning 44% by 2015. That was the year that then-CEO John Cryan said he would reduce the number of operating systems from 45 to four in 2020. Deutsche Bank still has 26, Sewing told investors in May. He kept the goal of eventually cutting them to four, but says the lender will need to run 10 to 15 systems for the foreseeable future.“Everyone knows that Deutsche Bank’s systems are a mess and I think they will have to end up spending more,” said Drach. “The fact that their new technology head hasn’t come on board yet gives them a good narrative for increasing the ultimate amount.”\–With assistance from Katie Linsell.To contact the reporter on this story: Nicholas Comfort in Frankfurt at ncomfort1@bloomberg.netTo contact the editors responsible for this story: Dale Crofts at dcrofts@bloomberg.net, James Hertling, Giles TurnerFor more articles like this, please visit us at bloomberg.com©2019 Bloomberg L.P.

Washington Monument gets turned into a life-sized rocket for Apollo 11 anniversary
Wed, 17 Jul 2019 03:02:00 +0000
The Smithsonian Institution’s National Air and Space Museum is projecting a life-sized, animated image of a Saturn V rocket on the launch pad onto the face of the Washington Monument in honor of the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission, which culminated with the first men walking on the moon.

The business lesson from Apollo 11 that we shouldn’t forget
Tue, 16 Jul 2019 22:13:00 +0000
As we celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing this month, much of our attention will be on the “what” and the “who” — the technology that took us there and the heroic teams of astronauts and engineers who did it. NASA didn’t achieve Apollo on its own. A simple piece of paper, it defined a reachable project goal, a technological endpoint.

5 Aerospace and Defense Companies Gurus Agree on
Tue, 16 Jul 2019 21:48:43 +0000
Aerospace and defense companies with high guru ownership in light of Apollo 11’s 50th anniversary Continue reading…

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